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Pregnancy Diet's Articles

Healthy Pregnancy Diet | Diet for Pregnant Women

You don’t have to give up all the foods you love when you’re pregnant. You just need to eat smart and make sure that most of your choices are healthy ones.

Follow the serving recommendations. And watch your portions—you may be eating more than you think! Avoid too much sugar and fat in your diet.

Eating a variety of foods from all of the food groups is the best way to ensure you are getting the calories and nutrients you need. The “Four Food Groups” pyramid is a good guideline for pregnant women; it ensures you consume the following minimum number of servings in each food group (about 2,500 calories).

Weight Gain During Pregnancy | BMI Chart

Gaining the right amount of weight during pregnancy by eating a healthy, balanced diet is a good sign that your baby is getting all the nutrients he or she needs and is growing at a healthy rate.

It depends on how much you weighed before you conceived and how appropriate that weight is for your height. The relationship between your height and weight is expressed in a number called a BMI (Body Mass Index). You can calculate your BMI from the the following BMI Chart. (Click on the BMI Chart to see it bigger)

BMI Chart

If your pre-pregnancy weight was in the healthy range for your height (a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9), you should gain between 25 and 35 pounds during pregnancy, gaining 1 to 5 pounds in the first trimester and about 1 pound per week for the rest of your pregnancy for the optimal growth of your baby.

If you were underweight for your height at conception (a BMI below 18.5), you should gain 28 to 40 pounds during pregnancy.

If you were overweight for your height (a BMI of 25 to 29.9), you should gain 15 to 25 pounds during pregnancy. If you were obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), you should gain between 11 and 20 pounds during pregnancy.

If you’re having twins, you should gain 37 to 54 pounds if you started at a healthy weight, 31 to 50 pounds if you were overweight, and 25 to 42 pounds if you were obese.

For example, the following BMI Table shows how to calculate the BMI Range based on mass (weight) of a 1.8 metres (5 ft 11 in) person

Category BMI range – kg/m2 BMI Prime Mass (weight) of a 1.8 metres (5 ft 11 in) person with this BMI
Severely underweight less than 16.5 less than 0.66 under 53.5 kilograms (8.42 st; 118 lb)
Underweight from 16.5 to 18.4 from 0.66 to 0.73 between 53.5 and 60 kilograms (8.42 and 9.45 st; 118 and 132 lb)
Normal from 18.5 to 24.9 from 0.74 to 0.99 between 60 and 81 kilograms (9.4 and 13 st; 130 and 180 lb)
Overweight from 25 to 30 from 1.0 to 1.2 between 81 and 97 kilograms (12.8 and 15.3 st; 180 and 210 lb)
Obese Class I from 30.1 to 34.9 from 1.21 to 1.4 between 97 and 113 kilograms (15.3 and 17.8 st; 210 and 250 lb)
Obese Class II from 35 to 40 from 1.41 to 1.6 between 113 and 130 kilograms (17.8 and 20.5 st; 250 and 290 lb)
Obese Class III over 40 over 1.6 over 130 kilograms (20 st; 290 lb)
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